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HERODES.

HERODES.

GENEALOGICAL TABLE OF THE FAMILY OF HEROD.

ANTIPATER, governor of Idumaea.

antipater, procurator of Judaea. Died b. c. 33. Mar­ried Cypros, an Ara­bian.

1

1

i

1

a J

died in

phasael, herod the great, captivity b. c. 40. died b. c. 4 ; married

Joseph.

•Pheroras, died b. c. 5 ; mar-

Salome, married,

I

ried a low-born 1.

Joseph,

woman.

2.

Costobarus,

I

3.

Alexas.

1

1

i

1. D

>ris.

2. Mariamne, granddaughter of

3. Mariamne, daughter of Simon

4. Malthace, a Samaritan.

5- Cleopa. tra, of Je-

~ Hyrcanus II.

the high priest. |

rusalem.

1

1

1

1 t

I

i

1

i

i

antipater, put to death

B.C. 4.

aristobulus, alexander, Salampsio, put to death b. put to death m. Phasael, c. 6. Married b.c. 6. m. her cousin.

Cypros, Herod m. An- Philip, tipater, m. He-

archblaus, king of Ju­daea B. C. 4.

herod antipas, tetrarch

Olympias, m. Joseph, her cousin.

Philip, tetrarch of Itu

Berenice, • Glaphyra, d.

sun of rodias,

Deposed and

ofGalilee

rsea.

daughter of of Archela-

Salome. who di-

died in ex-

and Pe-

Salome. us, king of

vorced

ile:

m. Gla-

raea. Died

Cappac

Locia.

'

hiir

i.

phyra, wi­dow of Alex-

in exile at Lyons :

ander.

m. Hero-

dias, the

wife of

Herod

Philip.

Salome.

1

1

|

1

1

|

herod died a.

agrippa, d. 44. m.

Herodias, Aristobulus, married, married Istapa, a

herod, king of Chaicis,

Alexa

nder.

Tigranes, king of Ar-

.Cypros, daughter 1. of Phasael and 2.

Herod Philip, Herod Antipas.

princess of Eme­sa.

died a.d. 48. .

menia.

Salampsio. I

|

|

• 1

1

herod agrippa II.

Mariamne. Berenice, Drusilla, Driisus, married, I.Herod, m. 1. Aziz, died young.

Tigranes, king of

kingofChal-

king of Chaicis, king of Emesa,

Armenia.

cis, died a.

2. Polemon, king 2. Felix.

1

b.90.

of Pontus.

1

i

Agri

ppa,

Alexander,

died a

. d. 79.

kine

of

Ciiicia.

Jewish citizens without trial. He presented him­self before his judges in the most arrogant manner, clad in a purple robe, and attended by a guard of armed men; but becoming apprehensive of an un­favourable decision, he departed secretly from Je­rusalem, and took refuge with Sex. Caesar, the Roman governor of Syria, by whom he was re­ceived with the utmost favour, and shortly after appointed to the government of Coele-Syria. Of this he immediately availed himself to levy an army and march against Jerusalem, with the view of expelling Hyrcanus and the party opposed to him, but the entreaties of his father Antipater and his brother Phasael induced him to withdraw without effecting his purpose.

These events took place in b. c. 46. Not long after, Sex. Caesar being put to death by Caecilius Bassus, Antistius, the Roman general in command in Cilicia, collected a large force, with which he marched against Bassus, and blockaded him in Apameia. Herod and his brother united their forces with those of Antistius, but notwithstanding the subsequent arrival and co-operation of Statius Murcus, the war was protracted until after the death of Caesar, when Cassius Longinus arrived in Syria (b. c. 43), and terminated the war by con­ciliation. Herod quickly rose to a high place in the favour of Cassius, which he gained particularly by the readiness with which he raised the heavy tribute imposed on his province : he was con­firmed in the government of Coele-Syria, and placed at the head of a large force both by sea and land. Meanwhile, his father Antipater was poi-.soned by Malichus, whose life he had twice saved. Herod at first pretended to believe the excuses of

Malichus, and to be reconciled to him, but soon took an opportunity to cause him to be assassinated near Tyre. As soon as Cassius had quitted Syria, the friends and partisans of Malichus sought to avenge his death by the expulsion of Herod and Phasael from Jerusalem, but the latter were tri­umphant ; they succeeded in expelling the insur­gents, with their leader, Felix, and even in defeat­ing Antigonus, the son of Aristobulus, who had invaded Judaea with a large army. The pre­tensions of Antigonus to the throne of Judaea were supported by Marion, king of Tyre, and by Pto­lemy Menneus, prince of Chalcis ; but Herod soon obtained a far more powerful auxiliary in the person of Antony, who arrived in Syria in b.c. 41, and whose favour he hastened to secure, by the most valuable presents. The aged Hyrcanus also, who had betrothed his grand-daughter Mariamne to the young Herod, threw all his influence into the scale in favour of him and his brother Phasael; and it was at his request that Antony appointed the two brothers tetrarchs of Judaea. Their power now seemed established, but the next year (b. c. 40) brought with it a complete revolution in the state of affairs. The exactions of the Roman go­vernors in Syria had excited general discontent, of which the Parthians took advantage, to invade the country with a large army under Pacorus, the king's son, and the Roman general, Labienus. They quickly made themselves masters not only of all Syria, but great part of Asia Minor, when Antigonus invoked their assistance to establish him on the throne of Judaea. Pacorus sent a powerful army, under Barzapharnes, against Jerusalem, and Herod and Phasael, unable to meet the enemy in

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